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The making of Flowers for Father

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Flower for Father by "Philipp Kipfer" (Filippo Lubiato) got 4-stars at BIAFF 2009.

The film that re-united father and son

Still from 'Flowers for Father'. The concept for the film was influenced by something which happened to Filippo's father Gisberto Lubiato. Gisberto intended to pay a visit to a retired colleague in his late 80s who was in hospital. However when he got to the appropriate room, his colleague was not there and a stranger lay in the bed. Believing his friend had been released from the hospital, Gisberto gave his flower bouquet to the unknown patient and talked to him until visiting hours ended. Later Gisberto found out that he was on the wrong floor of the hospital. Still from 'Flowers for Father'.

Flowers for Father was shot in barely three days. The emphasis is on days, because on those nights, the 85-year old star, Alfred Lengert, was simultaneously shooting with Filippo several scenes for the erotic thriller The Deep Bite.

The script called for shooting in the snow. This would give the film more poetry. However snow was very rare in the winter of 2005/2006. The media spoke anxiously of a once-in-a-century phenomenon. The day before shooting it started to snow it. All of the team celebrated this as a positive omen. Only cameraman Patrick Gautschy gnashed his teeth. The snow made his work on the exposure much harder.

The other actors are Carlo Segginger as the son. He had previously starred in Go Ahead in 1996. Claudia Progin-Blaser, also in Sublime (1997), took part as the receptionist.

Still from 'Flowers for Father'. Still from 'Flowers for Father'. Still from 'Flowers for Father'. Still from 'Flowers for Father'.

The film was published under the pseudonym Philipp Kipfer. Philipp stands for Filippo and with the last name of Kipfer, Filippo made a bond with Simon Kipfer, the sound and camera-assistant on Flowers for Father. What Filippo didn't know at that time is that Simon already has a brother with Philip as his first name! Coincidence.

From the start Flowers for Father received advice and assistance from various people who work in the field of Alzheimer's illness. That was somewhat surprising since some of them had feared the project could be misinterpreted.

The most beautiful prize that Flower for Father has won is the "Luccio d'oro" for the best story film at the CortoLovere Short Film Festival in 2007, which is a professionally oriented international festival in the North of Italy. Interestingly: the only amateur film in the festival took the prize for the best fiction.

Still from 'Flowers for Father'. Still from 'Flowers for Father'. Still from 'Flowers for Father'. Still from 'Flowers for Father'.

Filippo Lubiato with the Luccia d'oro trophy.The screening of Flowers for Father was greeted with moving, warm-hearted and prolonged applause from 300 people. Impressive. Some of the organisers suggested this might have been because many people in that area are sensitive to the illness. In the region there is a special hospital for dementia patients.

Flowers for Father was certainly responsible for Gisberto Lubiato inviting his son to his 75th birthday. As a result of family arguments he had broken off contact with his son for 12 years. During the birthday party Filippo gave his father a birthday gift: The "Luccio d'oro" from CortoLovere. Father and son have remained in contact ever since.



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Page updated on 06 October 2011
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